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Capt. Joseph Tymon

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Title Page
Introduction
Capt. W. Alderson
Capt. Edward B. Anderson
Purser Colin Arthur
Capt. Webster Augustus
Commodore W. J. Bassett
Engineer W. A. Black
Capt. W. Board
Mr. Oscar A. Burnside
Capt. James Carney
Capt. R. F. Carter
Capt. Robert C. Clapp
Capt. Charles T. Clark
Officer O. S. Clewlo
Capt. Robert Cooney
Capt. A. W. Crawford
Capt. J. V. Crawford
Capt. James Dougherty
Capt. Andrew Dunlop
Capt. E. Dunn
Capt. Henry Esford
Manager W. A. Esson
Inspector William Evans
Capt. Robert D. Foote
Wharfinger W. A. Geddes
Capt. Frederick Graves
Capt. William Hall
Engineer Frederick S. Henning
Capt. Frank Jackman
Capt. Joseph Jackson
Purser J. Jones
Capt. M. Kelly
Capt. Angus L. Kennedy
Engineer William Kennedy
Capt.W. B. Kitchen
Capt. Peter Lawson
Capt. Harry Michael Livingston
Capt. A. Macauley
Capt. D. MacLeod
Capt. John W. Maddick
Capt. James W. Mawdesley
Capt. Alexander McBride
Capt. William McClain
Capt. George McDougall
Capt. John McGiffin
Capt. John McGrath
Capt. James McMaugh
Capt. John McNab
Capt. James McSherry
Engineer Alex. R. Milne
Capt. C. J. Nickerson
Harbormaster Colin W. Postlewaithe
Capt. James Quinn
Capt. J. J. Quinn
Mr. W. E. Redway
Capt. John M. Scott
Capt. R. L. Sewell
Capt. P. Sullivan
Capt. David Sylvester
Capt. Soloman Sylvester
Capt. James B. Symes
Capt.W. R. Taylor
Capt. Ben Tripp
Capt. John V. Trowell
Capt. Andrew J. Tymon
Capt. Joseph Tymon
Capt. Alex Ure
Capt. John D. Van Alstine
Capt. W. R. Wakely
Capt. P. Walsh
Capt. George Williamson
Capt. J. E. Williscroft
Capt. James Wilson
Capt. James Wilson
Capt. Edward Zealand, Sr.
Capt.Edward Zealand, jr.
Capt. W. O. Zealand
Table of Illustrations
Index
The Globe, Oct. 16, 1897

Capt. Joseph Tymon of the Toronto Ferry Co.

Capt. Joseph Tymon, Commander of the steamer Island Queen, one of the Toronto Ferry Co.'s boats, is perhaps one of the youngest sailing masters on the lakes. He was born in Toronto, at the Tymon homestead, on the corner of Church and Esplanade streets, on the 13th of December, 1873, so that he will be twenty-four years of age in December of this year. Young Tymon received a thorough education in the Public Schools and Collegiate Institutes of Toronto, and afterward took a diploma at Mr. Conner O'Dea's business college in Toronto.

When Capt. Joseph was about eleven years of age he concluded that he could not do better than follow the avocation of his father, Capt. Andrew Tymon, so he shipped as a sailor in the steamer J. L. McEdwards, a vessel at that time belonging to his father. For two seasons he sailed as mate in her, then he entered as captain the steamer Ada Alice, another boat which belonged to his father. Both the J. L. McEdwards and the Ada Alice were in the fleet of ferry boats plying between Hiawatha Island and Toronto.Capt. Andrew Tymon built the steamers Island Queen and Truant in the year 1890, and that season Capt. Joseph Tymon sailed the Island Queen. For two seasons he sailed as chief officer in the big steamer A. J. Tymon, under Capt. James McSherry. Subsequently Capt. Joseph Tymon took command of the steamer Gertrude for the Toronto Ferry Co.; then he sailed the steamer Ada Alice during the seasons of 1895 and 1896 for the Doty Ferry Co., going back to the Toronto Ferry Co. in the spring of 1897, when he resumed charge of the steamer Gertrude. From the Gertrude he was appointed to the Island Queen, and has sailed the latter vessel ever since for the Toronto Ferry Co.

Capt. Joseph Tymon is a single man, and resides with his parents on the Esplanade in Toronto, at the foot of Church street. Politically he is a staunch Liberal, following in the footsteps of his father in that respect. Most notable in Capt. Joseph Tymon's career is the fact that he has saved thirteen people from drowning, every time at great peril to his own life. Nor must mention be forgotten that he is the champion ice-boater of these regions, his ice-yacht Jessica having carried everything before her for the last three seasons on Toronto Bay.

 


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