Chapter 34
1821-1830
Table of Contents

Title Page
1 Introductory
2 Geological
3 Poetry of the Lakes
4 Description
5 The Aborigines
6 French Discovery and occupation
7 Story of La Salle and the Griffin
8 Struggle for Possession
9 Under English Rule
10 Beginnings of Lake Commerce
11 War of 1812
12 War of 1812, Continued
13 War of 1812, Concluded
14 Growth of Traffic
Commerce Through St. Mary's Canals
15 Early Navigation on Lake Superior
16 The Convention of 1847
17 A Half Century Ago
18 Lake Canals
19 Lake Canals, Concluded
20 Harbors
21 Lighthouses
22 Life Saving Service
23 Development of Lake Vessels
24 The Lake Carriers
25 The Sailor
26 Navigation
27 Lumber Traffic
28 Grain Traffic
29 Coal Traffic
30 Iron Ore and Iron Industries
31 Miscellaneous
33 CHRONOLOGY.The Beginnings
33 After the War of 1812
34 1821-1830
[Introduction]
1821
1823.
1824.
1825.
1826
1827.
1828.
1829.
1830.
35 1831-1840
36 1841-1850
37 1851-1860
38 1861-1870
39 1871-1880
40 1881-1890
41 1891-1898
42 List of Lake Vessels
Table of Illustrations

1828.

The Schooner Canadian, built at York, was launched about the middle of April, and a day or two afterward the schooner George IV was launched. The steamer Alciope, built at Niagara, by Hon. Robert Hamilton and Andrew Heron, arrived on her first trip at York, June 26, 1828.

The Benjamin Rush, a revenue cutter of 35 tons, was launched September 13, 1828, at Erie. She was intended for the upper lakes.

Other Events of 1828. -- January 10: Schooner Dewitt Clinton arrives at Buffalo from Grand River. May 19: Congress appropriates $34,206 for Buffalo harbor. July 3: Steamer William Penn arrives at Buffalo from Green Bay, having made the trip in four and one-half days, the quickest time ever made between the two places. October 13: Schooner Louisa Jenkins ashore at Grand River: cargo damaged to the extent of $1,000. Schooner Columbus ashore at Grand River: principal part of cargo lost. Schooner Young Lion ashore at Otter Creek, U. C. British schooner Susan ashore at Otter Creek: 19, schooner Lady Washington, with cargo valued at $10,000, wrecked at Sturgeon Point; crew saved. December 4: Capt. James Rough, a native of Scotland, aged 67 years, dies at Black Rock; probably the oldest navigator then on the upper lakes, having commanded a vessel since 1790.

 


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Volume II

Some of the transcription work was also done by Brendon Baillod, who maintains an excellent guide to Great Lakes Shipwreck Research.